Tom Brady explains what a day in the life of Tom Brady is like

If you want to eat like Brady, you can!

The quarterback just released a $200 cookbook that consists of 89 recipes that all use ingredients that are Brady-approved. After dinner, it’s time for bedtime in the Brady house, and that’s when things get interesting.
So Brady does have a weakness: Reading Portuguese.

Jets fans, make sure to taunt him with signs written in Portuguese the next time the Patriots are playing in New York.

Anyway, between his family and football, it might not sound like Brady has much downtime, and that’s the truth.

“During the season, most of my time to unwind is in my car ride home,” Brady told ABC News. “When I get home, it’s being with my kids. There’s not much time to unwind, but you know what, it’s because I love what I do. I look forward to the season. I look forward to playing games. It doesn’t ever feel like work.”

When Brady does get some downtime in the offseason, there are a few things that he does like to do.

“I have hobbies. I like being active,” Brady said. “I like to surf a lot, play a little bit of golf.”

He also likes to cliff-dive.

Based on Brady’s lifestyle, it looks like Benjamin Franklin was right: “Early to bed and early to rise makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.”

The Ole’ Gunslinger is finally coming back to Lambeau Field. Brett Favre served notice of his return to Green Bay on Monday in order for the Packers to retire his jersey.

Favre posted a note on his website stating he’s “pleased to announce that I will be returning to Green Bay, Wisconsin in 2015 for induction into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame and retirement of my jersey.”

It’s been expected that No. 4 would come back to Lambeau at some point in order for him to be retired into the Packers Hall of Fame. There were concerns Favre might get booed if he came back in 2014 and the health of Bart Starr — Favre wanted to return with the other legendary Packers quarterback — proved to be an obstacle last year as well.

The Falcons are certainly not the first team to bring in SEALs to work with. ThePatriots did it last year, for example.

For four days, Falcons players worked with retired SEALs on “a combination of physical training and classroom sessions, focused on developing some of the core tools of SEAL training: mental toughness and resilience, teamwork and stress management.” What does that mean?

What did the coaches and players think of the experience? “We learned that leadership comes from all levels,” Quinn said. “Just because a player is going into his second or third year doesn’t mean he isn’t going to have significant leadership value here.”

Quarterback Matt Ryan noted that it wasn’t the first time a coach has brought in an outside influence to talk to players, but that this was different because the SEALs embedded themselves with the team for four days. He was also struck by how some teammates changed their routine due to the SEALs’ presence.

“We would see guys at 3:30 in the afternoon in our facility just talking with the SEALs. That doesn’t happen this time of the year. Usually when you are done, people are out of here pretty quickly.”

Philadelphia’s best fit: DB Jalen Mills, LSU, No. 233 overall

With at least one defensive back selected in nine of the past 10 drafts, LSU has become a virtual minor-league team for NFL clubs in need of help in the secondary.

And while he may lack the elite athleticism or stopping power that helped Patrick Peterson (Arizona Cardinals) and LaRon Landry (New York Jets) earned Pro Bowl honors after starring in the SEC, Mills offers plenty of traits which project well to the next level, including agility, instincts and versatility.

The 6-foot-1, 191-pound Mills started 46 games at LSU, beginning his career outside at cornerback before sliding inside to handle safety and nickel duties as an upperclassman. During that time, Mills recorded 216 tackles, 16 pass breakups and six interceptions.

To make it in professional football at age 38 (he turns 39 in August), Brady really has to take care of his body, and that’s where his day starts.

The quarterback says the he wakes up at 5:30 a.m. every day.

Adrian Peterson says Teddy Bridgewater reminds him of a Hall of Fame QB

Bridgewater was sacked on 9.0 percent of his dropbacks last seasons, one of the highest figures in the league. The signings of Alex Boone and Andre Smith, as well as the returns from injury of John Sullivan and Phil Loadholt, should help him stay upright in the pocket and maybe get a little more time to deliver the ball accurately and down the field. Bridgewater isn’t a great deep ball thrower, but if he has more time, it’s possible he takes more shots and lets his wide receivers such as Stefon Diggs and rookie Laquon Treadwell make plays on the ball.

“As far as Randy, it is a big step for him to be out here interacting, a big smile on his face and meeting people,” Stephen Jones said, via the team’s website. “This is good for him, and I appreciate him being out here.”

Without Fitzpatrick on the roster, the Jets are making alternate plans. They selected Christian Hackenberg in the second round of the NFL Draft from Penn State, and they kept Geno Smith, with the idea the two would compete for the job if Fitzpatrick doesn’t return.

Now, by all accounts, both sides want a reunion if the money is right, and Fantasy owners remain hopeful Fitzpatrick will be back in New York in 2016. While his production in 2015 was solid (3,905 passing yards, 31 touchdowns and 15 interceptions and 270 rushing yards and two touchdowns), it was what he did for Brandon Marshall and Eric Decker that has us concerned.

In an interview with Jim Rome, UFC president Dana White disputed the accuracy of that report.

“The reports that came out were not very accurate at all,” White said on the Jim Rome Show. “Obviously we’re a business, we’re always doing business, we’re always trying to grow the sport and take it to the next level, and we’re always working on deals, and as far being sold, people make us offers all the time. So we’ve turned downed some pretty big offers.”

Although White denied that the company was for sale, he didn’t deny anything when he was asked this week if only part of the company might be for sale.

“Obviously, if I’m in the middle of a deal right now, there’s a lot of confidentiality involved in it,” White told the Dan Patrick Show. “We’re working on expanding. We’re working on growing the company and moving it to other territories like China, Japan and Korea.”

“Keenan’s doing a heck of job,” he said. “It’s definitely a transition. It’s real. I think he said it. Guys have been doing this over and over again, rep after rep, thousands and thousands of reps under their belt. He’s got maybe a couple dozen under his belt right now, but that being said he’s doing really well. He’s a natural athlete. He’s got natural hands, which is a big plus. He can get in and out of routes. He’s a guy who’s still got a lot of work to do, but he has the ability to pull it off.”

Ward was Public Enemy No. 1 in Baltimore for years, but he could end up in the Hall of Fame one day too. And for as much as Ravens fans hated him, they would also love nothing more than having the next Hines Ward on their roster, haunting the Steelers for the next decade.

It’s worth noting that Brady, even while playing the so-called “caretaker QB” role early in his career, threw about three more passes than Bridgewater did in his first two seasons. And considering Brady came up in the early 2000s, when teams threw the ball less often than they do these days, the difference is probably even greater. Bridgewater edged out Brady in completion percentage, yards per attempt, and QB rating through two seasons, but Brady turned his throws into touchdowns more often (4.5 to 3.3 percent) while throwing interceptions at basically the same rate (2.6 percent to 2.5 percent).

Jerry Jones raves about Las Vegas, seems very open to a Raiders move

“It has a flair for entertainment, and it has two million people, and they’re avid sports fans, the full-time residents,” Jones said, via ESPN.com. “They have a huge visiting contingent that more often than not are fans of some NFL football teams. You add all that together, and it’s certainly in a conversation about the future relative to the NFL. As you well know, you have to have the right situation. You have to have the right ownership, want to and then a lot of other considerations that have to come into play.”

“For me, I think that certainly the fact that Las Vegas has a gambling aspect to it is far overshadowed by the entertainment value, if you will, family appeal, that you have, the convention appeal,” Jones said. “So it does not have disfavor with me, in my opinion, relative to being an NFL city.”

The mayor of Las Vegas seems to believe the Raiders are going to move, and with both Davis and Jones on board, a Raiders relocation to Sin City looks more and more realistic by the day.

After surviving a nightmarish season — a year filled with complicated contract negotiations, a foot injury, and multiple surgeries — Cowboys star receiver Dez Bryant still isn’t ready to completely take the field with the Cowboys when minicamp begins. He’s still not fully medically cleared.

That’s according to head coach Jason Garrett, who offered some insight into Bryant’s recovery from a January surgery on his right foot. The good news is that Bryant hasn’t suffered any setbacks thus far.

“He’s done a really good job with his rehab, and he’s made progress,” Garrett said, per ESPN. “Like with all those guys, it’s a day-by-day, week-by-week thing. But he’s had no setbacks, but he really continues to get better and better.”

If the Raiders remain in the Bay Area and Vegas approves stadium funding, that means Sin City would have an NFL-caliber stadium with no NFL team. And even if that happens, that still doesn’t mean the Chargers would move.

At that point, the only way the Chargers would move is if funds for the team’s new stadium didn’t get approved by voters in November.

The team has to collect 66,447 valid signatures by June to get the stadium funding initiative on the ballot in November.

It’s worth noting that the study did not use any concussion or CTE data. So, the research doesn’t indicate if former players with CTE had a higher suicide rate than those without CTE or the general population. That’s a significant shortcoming of the study, as the suicides of players who were diagnosed with CTE (like Junior Seau) have led to an important discussion about the dangers and negative consequences of football.

Marcus Stroman returns to Duke for his college graduation

On Saturday, the Washington Nationals made an obvious decision, exercising the two-year option they held on general manager Mike Rizzo’s contract. Rizzo’s tenure has largely been a success: he’s led the Nationals from a lengthy rebuild to four consecutive winning seasons and counting. But rather than restate his record and all that jazz, let’s mark the occasion by looking at his five best and worst moves.

Rizzo’s five best

1. The draft. Is this cheating? Probably. But under Rizzo’s watch, the Nationals have selected Stephen Strasburg , Bryce Harper , Anthony Rendon , andLucas Giolito . Quibble all you want with how much credit Rizzo should receive for those picks — or for grabbing a pair of generational talents, and two others who went later than expected — but it’s impossible to rank this collection lower than first.

You can play all three of these studs in a lineup with tonight’s top pitcher and still have nearly $3,000 to spend at the other positions. There’s no guarantee all three break out tonight, but it’s definitely worth trying in a couple of tournament lineups.
Starting Pitchers

Adam Conley ($8,300, $8,200)

If you’ve listened to our podcast at all, you know we like to give Chris Towers a hard time for his Conley fandom. I’m not as certain the young lefty has the same upside, but he has plenty of it against this matchup. The Phillies .273 wOBA and 24.1 percent K rate vs. LHP are just as bad as they sound. Conley is a solid favorite and the Phillies are projected to score the third least amount of runs.

Kenta Maeda ($8,800, $9,700)

On one hand, Maeda does have a good matchup against an Angels team that sports a .127 ISO vs. RHP. On the other, the Angels simply do not strike out. Maeda has the best shot of getting to seven innings and is the biggest favorite of the night. Only his strikeout potential holds him down. The discount price on FanDuel will make me take a hard look at him, even without the big strikeout potential.

Park’s power is no surprise; scouts knew he had impressive raw strength all along. The reservations about Park revolved around the fear that his swing-and-miss tendencies would be exacerbated by a move to the big leagues. Sure enough, his rate statistics resemble that of a traditional three-true-outcomes slugger. He’s K’d in more than 30 percent of his plate appearances, he’s walked in another nine percent, and he’s homered in more than seven percent. Add it all together, and that’s almost half his trips to the plate ending without a ball in play.
Rank Player Three True Outcome %
1 David Wright 54.1
2 Jason Castro 52.8
3 Bryce Harper 51.9
4 Joc Pederson 51.3
5 Steven Souza 50.4
13 Byung-ho Park 47.5

Predictably, Park’s contact woes have been as dire as expected. His 64.9 percent contact rate is among the lowest dozen or so in the game, and he’s whiffed on nearly 60 percent of his swings against breaking balls. Combine his inability to put the bat on the ball with his patient (but not always disciplined) approach, and you have the recipe for a lot of strikeouts. Park has been able to balance his strikeouts thus far by walking and bopping, yet his .324 ISO is certain to drop — last season, Bryce Harperled the majors with a .319 ISO — and the amount of the drop will determine where he falls on te average-to-above-average DH spectrum.

The Blue Jays took a quick 1-0 lead in the second inning Sunday on a Michael Saunders single. In the third, with his team still leading 1-0, Blue Jays skipper John Gibbons was ejected by home plate umpire Dan Iassogna for arguing balls and strikes. To the action footage:

Gibbons thought the 0-2 pitch to Rougned Odor should have been called a strike, and you know what? He’s probably right. Here is the PitchFX strike zone plot of the at-bat, courtesy of Brooks Baseball:

Pitch No. 3 is the pitch in question. Ultimately it did not matter on the field. Odor struck out two pitches later, except this time Gibbons was a spectator in the clubhouse after getting tossed.

Rays @ Blue Jays

This is partially for the BvP crowd, with the Jays having a ton of success against Happ in the past. The Rays haven’t been as good as you’d expect against RHP, but their .180 ISO is seventh in baseball and they get a huge park factor shift in the Rogers Centre. Any RHH in the top six in the order are in play, but it’s more of a tournament play than cash.
Lineups

I’m going to offer my early take on a cash game lineup, but of course you should always check out our Sportsline projections for lineup changes right up to lock. Also, check out our podcast on iTunes for extended thoughts on each slate from Chris Towers, Mike McClure and myself.

The hypothetical question about what Evan Gattis’ value would be if he were catcher-eligible again is about to get real.

MLB suspends Rockies’ Jose Reyes for domestic violence incident

Commissioner Rob Manfred released the following statement through the league:

My office has completed its investigation into the allegation that Jose Reyes committed an act of domestic violence on October 31, 2015. The investigation was prolonged and complicated initially by the existence of a pending criminal proceeding against Mr. Reyes in Hawaii involving the same allegation, which has since been dismissed. Mr. Reyes cooperated fully with my office’s investigation. Having reviewed all of the available evidence, I have concluded that Mr. Reyes violated the Policy and should be subject to discipline in the form of an unpaid suspension that will expire on May 31st. I am encouraged by Mr. Reyes’ commitment to the treatment provisions of the Policy in order to ensure that such an incident does not occur in the future. Mr. Reyes also agreed to contribute a total of $100,000 to one or more charitable organizations focused on preventing and treating survivors of domestic violence.”

As part of the agreement, Reyes will not appeal the suspension.

Reyes, 32, is under contract for 2016-17 at $22 million per. This means he’ll lose a little more than $7 million because of this suspension. His contract also includes a $22 million option/$4 million buyout for 2018.

He’ll return to the Rockies without a clear role, as rookie Trevor Story has shined as the team’s regular shortstop and projects as more valuable than Reyes moving forward.

That the suspension isn’t as long as some speculated it would be may ramp up trade interest in the veteran infielder. ESPN’s Buster Olney reports that that’s indeed the case.

Cons: As far as closers (or potential closers) go, Dyson is not much of a strikeout pitcher. Also, Jake Diekman has pitched well enough to lay claim to the closer’s role, should the need arise.
3. Sean Doolittle, Athletics (38 percent owned)
Sean Doolittle RP / Oakland Athletics (2016 STATS)
IP: 13 2/3 ERA: 3.95 K: 14 BB: 5

Pros: Doolittle was stellar as the A’s closer two seasons ago, when he was first elevated to the role. His velocity has rebounded to where it was in 2014 after recovering from last season’s shoulder issues. Doolittle’s strong control could be a welcome change of pace, if Madson’s recent wildness persists.

1. Dodgers LAA2, @LAA2, @SD3
2. Pirates ATL4, COL3
3. Mariners @BAL3, @CIN3
4. Indians CIN2, @CIN2, @BOS3
5. Cubs @MIL3, @SF3

The Dodgers get the Angels’ patchwork rotation for four games and miss both James Shields and Drew Pomeranz when they travel to San Diego, so they’re sitting pretty this week. And with nothing but right-handers on the schedule, Joc Pederson and Chase Utley especially are. It’s rare that they get to play a full week, but both have the splits to take advantage, posting an OPS over .900 against righties. Yasmani Grandal isn’t as available in CBSSports.com leagues, but he’s a more likely play for Head-to-Head owners, with their smaller roster sizes, especially given his recent power surge.
The winter before last, the A.J. Preller-led Padres had become the league’s most active dealers. Nary a day passed without Preller making some trade or another. Yet since last spring’s Craig Kimbrel swap, Preller has become conservative, perhaps overly so. He passed on dealing Justin Upton and Ian Kennedy prior to the trade deadline, and somehow exited the winter with his rotation intact.

Presumably, Preller intended for the Padres to contend this season — or to feign competitiveness, anyway (to be fair, they’re just 2 1/2 games back entering Friday night). More realistically, though, Preller probably hoped Cashner would pitch well enough to reject a qualifying offer at season’s end. Or, at minimum, that teams would pony up for Cashner and/or Ross (a free agent after 2017) as August 1 neared. In retrospect, however, it appears the Padres likely missed their window to maximize their returns on both — meaning, in basic terms, that the Padres will have undercut their rebuilding efforts by waiting too long to make a move.

Chargers’ Melvin Gordon reportedly had microfracture surgery on knee

But as Gehlken writes, not all microfractures are the same. Reggie Bush reportedly had microfracture following the 2008 season and followed that up with a career high 5.6 yards-per-carry average in 2009.

“Typically, I know especially in the NBA and the NFL, when people hear ‘microfracture surgery,’ they are going to think it could be a potentially career-ending injury,” Dr. Brian Schulz, an orthopedic surgeon at Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles, told Gehlken. “Normally, it’s more directly related to the size of the defect, what’s going on in the rest of the knee. If it’s a relatively small lesion that’s localized to a specific point, the microfracture has worked pretty well, even in professional athletes. … I don’t think microfracture is quite the kiss of death that everyone makes it out to be.”

If Gordon is healthy — and his recovery is expected to take 4-6 months — he gives Philip Rivers another young offensive threat to go along with rookie tight end Hunter Henry, the 35th pick in the 2016 NFL Draft.

One of the biggest ongoing dramas of the offseason has been the Colin Kaepernicksituation in San Francisco.

Although the 49ers quarterback demanded a trade back in February, there was no deal to be had. Now it looks like he’s going to be stuck with the 49ers in 2016, which isn’t necessarily a good thing, at least according to Joe Montana.

Although some teams might view as an honor to open the season on national television, that’s not how Gettleman sees things. The Panthers’ general manager says the Thursday night game puts his team at a competitive disadvantage.

“To me, playing in the opening game, on that Thursday night, is a little bit of a competitive disadvantage to those teams, compared to the other 30, because of the way the 53 cut is set up,” Gettleman told PFT Live recently.

Teams generally cut their roster down from 75 to 53 players on the Saturday before the Thursday night kickoff game, which gives the two teams in the opener just five days between final cuts and their first regular-season game.

Cardinals reportedly ‘deep’ in talks with Tyrann Mathieu on rich extension

The Arizona Cardinals have a lot of impressive pieces on their defense and are reportedly working hard to lock up one of the key pieces before the offseason really begins.

According to Ian Rapoport of NFL.com, Arizona is “deep in negotiations” with Tyrann Mathieu to try and work out a new deal with the safety, one that could even make him the highest-paid player at the position.